Facebook Launches Creative Labs to Stay Innovative

 

Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg has been trying to shape shift how the giant social platform company can create and distribute new services to stay innovative and attractive to its users.  Creative Labs will develop more apps, many not called Facebook or included in the web site.

Taking a page from the Harvard Business School and MIT where innovation labs and their importance to avoiding the innovator’s dilemma, Facebook has formed Creative Labs to revamp the way the company creates and distributes new services.

According to co-founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg: ” What we’re doing with Creative Labs is basically unbundling the big blue app.

From “one stop shopping” under the Facebook banner, the social media platform will begin to splinter into many smaller, more narrowly focused services.  Many will be single purpose apps that can easily be adapted to smartphones.  Single apps are also faster as Facebook found when comparing its own Facebook Messenger to WhatsApp.  Facebook will make Messenger a standalone app that will require a new installation by users, Facebook said.

Paper is one such app.  It’s an iPhone app that lets users navigate Facebook’s News Feed though a system of touch gestures.  While not yet popular, it represents the innovative resurgence Facebook is trying to create among its software developer staff.

The one-size-fits-all approach seems too unwieldy for future app development the company conceded.

P&G has orchestrated such a multi-brand strategy for diverse audiences and product categories without diluting the P&G name but still maintaining its product innovation and creativity.

The failure to adapt to new audiences and consumers is most linked to companies’ obsolescence, according to such innovation gurus Clayton Christensen, Henry Chesbrough, Adrian Slywotsky, Bruce Nussbaum, and Tim Harford.

Currently, nearly a fifth of the time Americans spend on their smartphones is spent on Facebook.  With Creative Labs, Facebook is announcing it “gets it.”

Here’s the piece in today’s NY Times business section by Farhad Manjoo:

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/17/technology/the-future-of-facebook-may-not-say-facebook.html?ref=todayspaper&_r=0

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