Scroogled

Microsoft is waging a surprisingly open and
negative war against Google in its quest to Screen Shot 2013-02-18 at 3.37.37 PMpromote its Outlook.com mail service in favor of Google’s Gmail.

The company has used Facebook and Twitter aggressively to tell its customers and followers that they are being “scroogled” because Google “reads” the data in its Gmail service to tailor ads based on its users’ preferences.

According to Fortune‘s tech blog, Microsoft has authored a petition through Care2, a website aimed at promoting social causes:

The petition reads in part: “Google earns money by violating your privacy. They go through every word of your personal Gmail so they can target you with ads. Every word of every email. Even the most private ones. Do you feel violated yet?” And it goes on to tout Microsoft’s own email service: “At Outlook, we prioritize your privacy. But even if you don’t use Gmail, Google will still go through emails you send to someone who does in order to sell ads. There is absolutely no way to opt out — whether you’re a Gmail user or not.”

Now, Microsoft’s petition and social media campaign has Care2 considering changing its terms of service to prevent businesses from using its website for commercial purposes.

Technically, no one at Google is reading through any individual’s email. And a quick search at Care2 confirms Microsoft’s petition has spawned similar petitions aimed at getting Microsoft to stop being disingenuous.

This is one social media campaign that might just backfire…

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This entry was posted in Google, Microsoft, Privacy and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Scroogled

  1. Adam Preset says:

    Microsoft: “Google, we know you’re a successful advertising company, and the reason we know that is that 97% of your revenue comes from advertising. We like to pretend that most people don’t know that and assume you just give away services ‘for free’ out of pure goodness. Those people will appreciate us looking out for them. We only get about 4% of our revenue from advertising and are not as good at it, so we’re more trustworthy. Please change your business model.”

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